Home » Blog » bookkeeping Miami

bookkeeping Miami

accounting firms in Miami,LLP,LLC,Corporation,bookkeeper,accountants,accountant ,CPA,How to find an accountant,Raise Venture Capital,Write a Business Plan,accountant,bookkeeper in Miami,Starting a Business,Write a business plan,accountant in Miami,How to start a Business

How to start a Business

Conduct market research. Market research will tell you if there’s an opportunity to turn your idea into a successful business. Then hire an accountant in Miami. Write a business plan. Fund your business. Pick your business location. Choose a business structure. Choose your business name. Register your business. Get federal and state tax IDs.

Accountant,Certified Public Accountant,capital gains,Accountants Can Help Key Performance Indicators,Accountants Strategy For Struggling Businesses,Accountant,Why You Should I Hire an Accountant For a Small Company?,Maximize Your Accountant Relationship,Financial Statement Footnotes,Financial Statement Disclosures or Footnotes,Cost of Sales,COGS ,Cost of Goods Sold ,Last in last out accounting,LIFO accounting,First in first out accounting,FIFO accounting,accounting methods ,income before taxes,income from operations,operating expenses,Multi-Step income statement,Single Step income statement,balance sheet,income statement represents a period of time,gross profit,net profit,net income,company’s financial statement,statement of operations,operating statement,earnings statement,statement of financial performance,revenue statement,profit and loss statement,Profit & Loss,P&L,Income statement,How to read a P&L,How to read an Income Statement

How to read an Income Statement

Income statement (also referred to as profit and loss statement (P&L), revenue statement, statement of financial performance, earnings statement, operating statement, or statement of operations) is a company’s financial statement that indicates how the revenue (money received from the sale of products and services before expenses are taken out, also known as the “top line”) is transformed into the net income (the result after all revenues and expenses have been accounted for, also known as Net Profit or the “bottom line”). It displays the revenues recognized for a specific period, and the cost and expenses charged against these revenues, including write-offs (e.g., depreciation and amortization of various assets) and taxes. The purpose of the income statement is to show managers and investors whether the company made or lost money during the period being reported.

financial accounting accounting, balance sheet, statement of financial position, statement of financial condition, balance sheet, Accountant, Accountant in Miami, Accountants in Miami, small business accounting firms, WHAT IS A BALANCE SHEET, How to read a Balance Sheet, HOW TO READ & UNDERSTAND A BALANCE SHEET, The Purpose of the Balance Sheet, Miami accountants, accounting and tax, small business cpa, auditors, small business tax accountants

How to read a Balance Sheet

How to read a balance sheet In financial accounting, a balance sheet or statement of financial position or statement of financial condition is a summary compiled by the Accountant of the financial balances of an individual or organization, whether it be a sole proprietorship, a business partnership, a corporation, private limited company or other organization such as government or not-for-profit entity. Assets, liabilities, and ownership equity are listed as of a specific date, such as the end of its financial year. A balance sheet is often described as a “snapshot of a company’s financial condition”. Of the four basic financial statements, the balance sheet is the only statement which applies to a single point in time of a business’ calendar year.

accountant, Difference Between LLC and S Corp, Is it best to be taxed as an LLC or Sub S Corporation, LLC, Limited Liability Company, Sub S Corporation, pass-through entities, avoid double taxation, payroll tax, S Corporation, S Corp, LLC vs. S Corporation, C corporations, Management Structure of an LLC, Management Structure of S Corporations, Qualified Business Income Deduction, Limitations on Business Losses

Difference Between LLC and S Corp

For federal income tax purposes, there is no such thing as being taxed as an LLC or Sub S. Both are treated by the IRS as pass-through entities which are business entities in which income is passed through to its owners and taxed at their personal tax rate. This method allows businesses to avoid double taxation and potentially reduce their overall taxes owed. However, a single member LLC is taxed as a sole proprietor and will incur additional payroll tax, unlike Sub S. An LLC is not a corporation, it’s a partnership. Talk to an Accountant before you decide.

How to Understand the Cash Flow Statement, Cash Flow Statement, Cash Flow. WHAT IS A CASH FLOW STATEMENT, what are Operating activities and investing activities, what are Financing activities, HOW TO INTERPRET A CASH FLOW STATEMENT, HOW CASH FLOW IS CALCULATED, Cash Flow Statement Direct Method, Cash Flow Statement Indirect Method, accounting period, Positive Cash Flow, Negative Cash Flow, CASH FLOW STATEMENT EXAMPLE, accountant

How to Understand the Cash Flow Statement

In financial accounting, a cash flow statement, also known as statement of cash flows, is a financial statement that shows how changes in balance sheet accounts and income affect cash and cash equivalents, and breaks the analysis down to operating, investing, and financing activities. Essentially, the cash flow statement is concerned with the flow of cash in and out of the business. As an analytical tool, the statement of cash flows is useful in determining the short-term viability of a company, particularly its ability to pay bills. International Accounting Standard 7 (IAS 7) is the International Accounting Standard that deals with cash flow statements.

Tax Changes for Small Businesses

Tax Changes for Small Businesses

In 2010, new laws, such as the Affordable Care Act and the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010, created or expanded deductions and credits that small businesses and self-employed individuals should consider when completing their tax returns and making business decisions in 2011.

how to find a good accountant,how to find an accountant for a small business,how to find an accountant for small business,how to find an accountant,do you need an accountant for small business,accounting fees,business accountant,when to hire an accountant for a small business,how to find the best accountant,corporate tax,small business accounting,cash flow,find an accountant,accounting firms, bookkeeping

How to Find an Accountant for a Small Business

Do you need an Accountant for Small Business? The answer is Yes. We get it—whether you’re a seasoned vet or just starting up, every small business owner wants to cut down on costs. So you only spend on what’s necessary for your business. Well, we’re here to tell you how to find a good accountant and how necessary for your small business—and well worth the accounting fees. When it comes down to it, a business accountant can save your business thousands and make your life as a small business owner that much easier. With that in mind, when to hire an accountant for a small business? And how to find the best accountant for your small business?

Home Office Deduction,accountant,Miami accountants

Home Office Deduction

Deductions for working from home center around the concept of a home office deduction. That is, §280A(a) disallows all deductions “with respect to the use of” a taxpayer’s residence. However, §280A(c) removes that barrier if the taxpayer uses a portion of the home “exclusively and on a regular basis” for any one of three purposes: (1) as the taxpayer’s principal place of business; (2) as “a” place of business where the taxpayer meets with patients, clients, or customers to whom the taxpayer provides services; or (3) in any way reasonably connected with the taxpayer’s trade or business if and only if the physical area so used is an outbuilding, “a separate structure which is not attached to the dwelling unit.”

Accounting,accountant,accountants,assisted living facilities,adult daycare,bookkeeping,bookkeepers, Outsourcing Accounting,payroll taxes

Finance 101 For Assisted Living Facilities and Adult Daycare Centers

Since I became involved in accounting for assisted living facilities and adult daycare centers, I have had the opportunity to learn a lot about financial management. I have had the privilege of helping dozens of clients start, grow, and sell their facility businesses, too. I’m sure that I learned most of what I know from the mistakes that I made. Tuition is what I call costly mistakes. Lessons that come with a price. Many of my clients have made mistakes, too. I see them every day. But I also get to see great ideas and best practices. In this post, I want to share with you a list of the biggest mistakes and the corresponding best practices in financial management by small and large assisted living facilities and adult daycare centers providers.

Health Care Providers, accountants, COVID-Impacted Health Care Providers,federal income tax return,Tax ID Number

Additional Funding Opportunity for COVID-Impacted Health Care Providers

Many accountants are witnessing health care providers who are experiencing significant financial hardships in the COVID-19 pandemic. Congress provided $175 billion in relief funds to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to deliver financial relief to hospitals and other health care providers, including those on the front lines of the coronavirus response. Since March, HHS, through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), has been distributing the funds to various providers in phases to support their increased healthcare-related expenses or lost revenue that is attributable to COVID-19 and to reimburse claims for the testing and treatment of uninsured individuals diagnosed with COVID-19.

Share Page

Close
Scroll to Top